Welcome to CDC stacks | Hispanics or Latinos Living with Diagnosed HIV: Progress Along the Continuum of HIV Care — United States, 2010 - 54954 | Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR)
Stacks Logo
Advanced Search
Select up to three search categories and corresponding keywords using the fields to the right. Refer to the Help section for more detailed instructions.
 
 
Help
Clear All Simple Search
Advanced Search
Hispanics or Latinos Living with Diagnosed HIV: Progress Along the Continuum of HIV Care — United States, 2010
  • Published Date:
    Oct 10 2014
  • Source:
    MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2014; 63(40):886-890.
Filetype[PDF-210.71 KB]


Details:
  • Pubmed ID:
    25299604
  • Pubmed Central ID:
    PMC4584610
  • Description:
    The goals of the National HIV/AIDS Strategy are to reduce new human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections, increase access to care and improve health outcomes for persons living with HIV, and reduce HIV-related health disparities. In July 2013, by presidential executive order, the HIV Care Continuum Initiative was established, focusing on accelerating federal efforts to increase HIV testing, care, and treatment. Hispanics or Latinos are disproportionately affected by HIV infection; the annual rate of HIV diagnosis among Hispanics or Latinos is approximately three times that of non-Hispanic whites. To achieve the goals of the National HIV/AIDS Strategy, and to be consistent with the HIV Care Continuum Initiative, Hispanics or Latinos living with HIV infection need improved levels of care and viral suppression. Achieving these goals calls for 85% of Hispanics or Latinos with diagnosed HIV to be linked to care, 80% to be retained in care, and the proportion with an undetectable viral load (VL) to increase 20% by 2015. Analysis of data from the National HIV Surveillance System (NHSS) and the Medical Monitoring Project (MMP) regarding progress along the HIV care continuum during 2010 for Hispanics or Latinos with diagnosed HIV infection indicated that 80.3% of HIV-diagnosed Hispanics or Latinos were linked to care, 54.4% were retained in care, 44.4% were prescribed antiretroviral therapy (ART), and 36.9% had achieved viral suppression (VL result of ≤200 copies/mL). Among Hispanic or Latino males and females, the percentages that were linked to care, were prescribed ART, and had achieved viral suppression were similar; however, the percentage retained in care was lower among males compared with females. The levels of linkage to care and viral suppression were lower among Hispanics or Latinos with HIV infection attributed to injection drug use than among those with HIV infection attributed to heterosexual or male-to-male sexual contact. These data demonstrate the need for implementation of interventions and public health strategies that increase linkage to care, retention in care, and consistent ART among Hispanics or Latinos, particularly Hispanics or Latinos who inject drugs.

  • Document Type:
  • Place as Subject:
  • Main Document Checksum:
No Related Documents.
You May Also Like: