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Changes in Self-Reported Smokefree Workplace Policy Coverage Among Employed Adults—United States, 2003 and 2010–2011
  • Published Date:
    Sep 25 2018
  • Source:
    Nicotine Tob Res. 20(11):1327-1335.
  • Language:
    English


Public Access Version Available on: September 25, 2019 information icon
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Details:
  • Keywords:
  • Pubmed ID:
    29059420
  • Pubmed Central ID:
    PMC5897188
  • Description:
    Introduction

    The workplace is a major source of exposure to secondhand smoke from combustible tobacco products. Smokefree workplace policies protect nonsmoking workers from secondhand smoke and help workers who smoke quit. This study examined changes in self-reported smokefree workplace policy coverage among U.S. workers from 2003 to 2010–2011.

    Methods

    Data came from the 2003 (n = 74,728) and 2010–2011 (n = 70,749) waves of the Tobacco Use Supplement to the Current Population Survey. Among employed adults working indoors, a smoke-free workplace policy was defined as a self-reported policy at the respondent’s workplace that did not allow smoking in work areas and public/common areas. Descriptive statistics were used to assess smokefree workplace policy coverage at two timepoints overall, by occupation, and by state.

    Results

    The proportion of U.S. workers covered by smokefree workplace policies increased from 77.7% in 2003 to 82.8% in 2010–2011 (p < .00001). The proportion of workers reporting smokefree workplace policy coverage increased in 21 states (p < .001) and decreased in two states (p < .001) over this period. In 2010–2011, by occupation, this proportion ranged from 74.3% for blue collar workers to 84.9% for white collar workers; by state, it ranged from 63.3% in Nevada to 92.6% in Montana.

    Conclusions

    From 2003 to 2010–2011, self-reported smokefree workplace policy coverage among indoor adult workers increased nationally, and occupational coverage disparities narrowed. However, coverage remained unchanged in half of states, and disparities persisted across occupations and states. Accelerated efforts are warranted to ensure that all workers are protected by smokefree workplace policies.

    Implications

    This study assessed changes in the proportion of indoor workers reporting being covered by smokefree workplace policies from 2003 to 2010–2011 overall and by occupation and by state, using data from the Tobacco Use Supplement to the Current Population Survey. The findings indicate that smokefree workplace policy coverage among U.S. indoor workers has increased nationally, with occupational coverage disparities narrowing. However, coverage remained unchanged in half of states, and disparities persisted across occupations and states. Accelerated efforts are warranted to ensure that all workers are protected by smokefree workplace policies.

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