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Pressure ulcers among nursing home residents; United States, 2004
  • Published Date:
    February 2009
Filetype[PDF-606.21 KB]


Details:
  • Corporate Authors:
    National Center for Health Statistics (U.S.)
  • Description:
    "Data from the National Nursing Home Survey, 2004. In 2004, about 159,000 current U.S. nursing home residents (11%) had pressure ulcers. Stage 2 pressure ulcers were the most common. Residents aged 64 years and under were more likely than older residents to have pressure ulcers. Residents of nursing homes for a year or less were more likely to have pressure ulcers than those with longer stays. One in five nursing home residents with a recent weight loss had pressure ulcers. Thirty-five percent of nursing home residents with stage 2 or higher (more severe) pressure ulcers received special wound care services in 2004. Pressure ulcers, also known as bed sores, pressure sores, or decubitus ulcers, are wounds caused by unrelieved pressure on the skin. They usually develop over bony prominences, such as the elbow, heel, hip, shoulder, back, and back of the head. Pressure ulcers are serious medical conditions and one of the important measures of the quality of clinical care in nursing homes. From about 2% to 28% of nursing home residents have pressure ulcers. The most common system for staging pressure ulcers classifies them based on the depth of soft tissue damage, ranging from the least severe to the most severe. There is persistent redness of skin in stage 1; a loss of partial thickness of skin appearing as an abrasion, blister, or shallow crater in stage 2; a loss of full thickness of skin, presented as a deep crater in stage 3; and a loss of full thickness of skin exposing muscle or bone in stage 4. Clinical practice guidelines for pressure ulcers have been developed and provide specific treatment recommendations for stage 2 or higher pressure ulcers, including proper wound care. This Data Brief presents the most recent national estimates of pressure ulcer prevalence, resident characteristics associated with pressure ulcers, and the use of wound care services in U.S. nursing homes. All material appearing in this report is in the public domain and may be reproduced or copied without permission; citation as to source, however, is appreciated."

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