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Prevention of genital HPV infection and sequelae; report of an external consultants' meeting
  • Published Date:
    December 1999
Filetype[PDF - 390.75 KB]


Details:
  • Corporate Authors:
    National Center for HIV, STD, and TB Prevention (U.S.), Division of STD Prevention. ; National Center for Infectious Diseases (U.S.) ; Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U.S.) ; ... More ▼
  • Document Type:
  • Description:
    Genital human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is the most common sexually transmitted disease (STD) in the United States and is of increasing public health concern, yet no prevention programs have been established. Certain HPV types cause abnormal Pap smears and are etiologically related to cervical, vulvar, anal, and penile cancers; other types cause genital warts, recurrent respiratory papillomatosis, and low-grade Pap smear abnormalities. Recommendations for programmatic activities, prevention research, and evaluation were developed by a group of invited experts who met in Atlanta on April 13-14, 1999. This consultation on "Prevention of Genital HPV Infection and Sequelae" was cosponsored by CDC's Division of STD Prevention (DSTD), National Center for HIV, STD, and TB Prevention (NCHSTP); Division of Cancer Prevention and Control (DCPC), National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP); Division of Viral and Rickettsial Diseases (DVRD), National Center for Infectious Diseases (NCID); and the American Cancer Society (ACS). Discussions were focused around key questions for seven topics pertinent to prevention of genital HPV infection and sequelae: the role of HPV testing in cervical cancer screening, cancer screening in adolescents, non-vaccine approaches to primary prevention of HPV infection, preparedness for prophylactic HPV vaccines, public and provider awareness, prevention of anal cancer, and surveillance for HPV and cancer. Following a summary of the discussion of the issues in each core topic area, recommendations are listed. These include recommendations (summarized below) for programmatic public health/prevention activities ready for implementation in the near future as well as recommendations for prevention research or other evaluation activities. While these recommendations were made primarily as suggestions for CDC and ACS, many are also relevant for other organizations interested in prevention of genital HPV or related sequelae (e.g., the National Institutes of Health). The intent of this report is to stimulate long-term collaborative efforts among a variety of organizations.

  • Supporting Files:
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