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Primary Care Providers’ Level of Preparedness for Recommending Physical Activity to Adults With Disabilities
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Details:
  • Pubmed ID:
    29144893
  • Pubmed Central ID:
    PMC5695639
  • Description:
    Introduction

    Adults with disabilities are more likely to be physically inactive than those without disabilities. Although receiving a health care provider recommendation is associated with physical activity participation in this population, there is little information on factors associated with primary care providers recommending physical activity to patients with disabilities.

    Methods

    We used 2014 DocStyles data to assess primary care provider characteristics and perceived barriers to and knowledge-related factors of recommending physical activity to adult patients with disabilities, by how prepared primary care providers felt in making recommendations. We used log-binomial regression to estimate adjusted prevalence ratios (PRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) between recommending physical activity at most visits and primary care provider characteristics and preparedness.

    Results

    Most primary care providers strongly (36.3%) or somewhat (43.3%) agreed they felt prepared to recommend physical activity to patients with disabilities. We found significant trends between preparedness and primary care provider age (P = .001) and number of patients with disabilities seen per week (P < .001). Half (50.6%) of primary care providers recommend physical activity to patients with disabilities at most visits. Primary care providers who strongly agreed (adjusted PR, 1.74; 95% CI, 1.44–2.09) or somewhat agreed (adjusted PR, 1.36; 95% CI, 1.22–1.65) they felt prepared were more likely to recommend physical activity at most visits compared with those who were neutral or disagreed.

    Conclusion

    Primary care providers are more likely to recommend physical activity to patients with disabilities regularly if they feel prepared. Understanding factors and barriers associated with preparedness can help public health programs develop and disseminate resources for primary care providers to promote physical activity among adults with disabilities.

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