30 years of HIV in Hispanic/Latino communities : a timeline
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30 years of HIV in Hispanic/Latino communities : a timeline

  • Published Date:

    6/2/11

  • Language:
    English
Filetype[PDF-48.16 KB]


Details:
  • Alternative Title:
    Thirty years of HIV in Hispanic/Latino communities : a timeline
  • Description:
    1981 – CDC reports first known cases of what we now call AIDS in its Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 1983 – CDC reports that 14% of all cases reported for that year are among Hispanics/Latinos* 1984 – Dr. Robert Gallo identifies HIV as the cause of AIDS 1985 – The first test to detect HIV antibodies (called Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay or ELISA) is approved in the United States 1986 – A special Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report on “AIDS Among Blacks and Hispanics,” finds that Hispanics/Latinos have an overall AIDS rate nearly 3.5 times higher than whites* 1987 – CDC holds its first National Conference on HIV and communities of color 1988 – LGBT and AIDS activist Pedro Julio Serrano becomes the first openly HIV-positive and openly gay person to run for public office in Puerto Rico 1989 – The mother of Eliana Martinez, an 8 year old AIDS patient who contracted the virus through a tainted blood transfusion, successfully appeals a court ruling calling for the girl to be allowed in school only if she remains in a glass cage during classes 1990 – The Ryan White Comprehensive AIDS Resources Emergency (CARE) Act of 1990 is enacted by Congress, providing federal funds for care and treatment 1993 – Dominican-born American actress, attorney and activist Ilka Tanya Payán becomes one of the first Latino celebrities to publicly disclose her status 1994 – Pedro Zamora, a Cuban-American HIV-positive gay man, appears on the cast of MTV’s popular show “The Real World” and publicly discloses his status. Zamora dies later this year at age 22 1994 – Former NY City Human Rights Commissioner Dennis DeLeon helps found the Latino Commission on AIDS, a nonprofit organization dedicated to fighting the spread of HIV/AIDS in the Latino community 1994 – AIDS becomes the leading cause of death for all Americans ages 25-44; remains so through 1995 1994 – CDC publishes recommendations on the use of AZT to reduce mother-to-child transmission 1995 – The following year, the agency reports that the number of children with perinatally acquired AIDS declines 27% between 1992 and 1995, with the most dramatic drop in cases occurring in 1994 and 1995 1995 – First protease inhibitor approved by the US FDA, ushering in a new era of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) 1999 – Congressional Hispanic Caucus, with the Congressional Hispanic Caucus Institute, convenes Congressional hearing on impact of HIV/AIDS on Latino community 2000 – HIV cases among Black and Latino men who have sex with men (MSM) exceed those among their white counterparts* 2003 – First Annual National Latino AIDS Awareness Day (NLAAD – Oct. 15th) in the United States June 2006 – CDC recommends routine HIV testing in health care settings for all adults, aged 13-64 2008 – 17th International AIDS Conference ("Universal Action Now") takes place in Mexico City; the first to be held in Latin America 2008 – New HIV incidence estimates show the number of new infections among Hispanics/Latinos, though unacceptably high, has remained stable for more than a decade* April 2009 – The White House partners with CDC to launch Act Against AIDS, the first national HIV awareness campaign in two decades July 2010 – Obama Administration releases first National HIV/AIDS Strategy for the United States which calls on the nation to focus HIV prevention efforts on those at greatest risk, including Hispanics/Latinos October 2010 – CDC expands its Act Against AIDS Leadership Initiative to include leading Hispanic/Latino and MSM-focused organizations in the fight against HIV November 2010 – NIH announces the results of its iPrEx trial, which shows that giving a once-daily pill containing drugs used to treat HIV to HIV-negative, high-risk men who have sex with men (MSM) reduces their risk of acquiring HIV by 44% 2011: NIH publishes the results of the HPTN 052 study which shows that taking antiretroviral drugs at the onset of HIV leads to a dramatic reduction in HIV transmission to an uninfected heterosexual partner Today: Although historically, the number of new infections among Latinos has been lower than that of whites and blacks, Latinos continue to bear a disproportionate burden of the HIV epidemic. Hispanics represent approximately 16 percent of the U.S. population and account for an estimated 18 percent of those living with HIV. Among Hispanics/Latinos, gay and bisexual men are the most affected. Since the beginning of the epidemic, more than 85,000 Hispanics with AIDS have died Publication date from document properties. timeline-30years-hiv-latino-community-508.pdf
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