Welcome to CDC stacks | Alcohol Advertising in Magazines and Underage Readership: Are Underage Youth Disproportionately Exposed? - 49359 | CDC Public Access
Stacks Logo
Advanced Search
Select up to three search categories and corresponding keywords using the fields to the right. Refer to the Help section for more detailed instructions.
 
 
Help
Clear All Simple Search
Advanced Search
Alcohol Advertising in Magazines and Underage Readership: Are Underage Youth Disproportionately Exposed?
  • Published Date:
    Sep 13 2017
  • Source:
    Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 41(10):1775-1782
  • Language:
    English
Filetype[PDF-593.30 KB]


Details:
  • Pubmed ID:
    28905397
  • Pubmed Central ID:
    PMC5657605
  • Description:
    Background

    The question of whether underage youth are disproportionately exposed to alcohol advertising lies at the heart of the public health debate about whether restrictions on alcohol advertising are warranted. The aim of this study was to determine whether alcohol brands popular among underage (ages 12 – 20 years) drinkers (“underage brands”) are more likely than others (“other brands”) to advertise in magazines with high underage readerships.

    Methods

    We analyze the advertising of 680 alcohol brands in 49 magazines between 2006 and 2011. Using a random effects probit model, we examine the relationship between a magazine’s underage readership and the probability of an underage or other brand advertising in a magazine, controlling for young adult (ages 21–29 years) and total readerships, advertising costs and expenditures, and readership demographics.

    Results

    We find that underage brands are more likely than other brands to advertise in magazines with a higher percentage of underage readers. Holding all other variables constant at their sample means, the probability of an “other” brand advertising in a magazine remains essentially constant over the range of underage readership from 0.010 (95% CI, 0.007–0.013) at 5 percent to 0.012 (95% CI, 0.008–0.016) at 35 percent. In contrast, the probability of an underage brand advertising nearly quadruples, ranging from 0.025 (95% CI, 0.015–0.035) to 0.096 (95% CI, 0.057–0.135), where underage brands are 7.90 (95% CI, 3.89–11.90) times more likely than other brands to advertise.

    Conclusions

    Alcohol brands popular among underage drinkers are more likely than other brands to advertise in magazines with high underage readerships, resulting in the disproportionate exposure of underage youth. Current voluntary advertising industry guidelines are not adequate to protect underage youth from high and disproportionate exposure to alcohol advertising in magazines. To limit advertising exposure among underage youth, policy makers may want to consider regulation of alcohol advertising in magazines.

  • Document Type:
  • Collection(s):
  • Main Document Checksum:
No Related Documents.
You May Also Like: