Employing continuous quality improvement in community-based substance abuse programs
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Employing continuous quality improvement in community-based substance abuse programs
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Details:
  • Alternative Title:
    Int J Health Care Qual Assur
  • Description:
    Purpose This article describes Continuous Quality Improvement (CQI) for substance abuse prevention and treatment programs in a community-based organization setting. Method Continuous Quality Improvement (e.g., Plan-Do-Study-Act cycles) applied in healthcare and industry was adapted for substance abuse prevention and treatment programs in a community setting. We assessed the resources needed, acceptability and CQI feasibility for ten programs by evaluating CQI training workshops with program staff and a series of three qualitative interviews over a nine month implementation period with program participants. The CQI activities, PDSA cycle progress, effort, enthusiasm, benefits and challenges were examined. Limitations The study was conducted on a small number of programs. It did not assess CQI impact on service quality and intended program outcomes. Findings Results indicated that CQI was feasible and acceptable for community-based substance abuse prevention and treatment programs; however, some notable resource challenges remain. Future studies should examine CQI impact on service quality and intended program outcomes. Implications for research, practice and/or society This project shows that it is feasible to adapt CQI techniques and processes for community-based programs substance abuse prevention and treatment programs. These techniques may help community-based program managers to improve service quality and achieve program outcomes. Value One of the first studies to adapt traditional CQI techniques for community-based settings delivering substance abuse prevention and treatment programs.
  • Pubmed ID:
    23276056
  • Pubmed Central ID:
    PMC5646166
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