Systematic Review, Meta-analysis, and Cost-effectiveness of Treatment of Latent Tuberculosis to Reduce Progression to Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis
Advanced Search
Select up to three search categories and corresponding keywords using the fields to the right. Refer to the Help section for more detailed instructions.
 
 
i

Superseded

This Document Has Been Replaced By:

i

Retired

This Document Has Been Retired

i

Up-to-date Information

This is the latest update:

Systematic Review, Meta-analysis, and Cost-effectiveness of Treatment of Latent Tuberculosis to Reduce Progression to Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis
  • Published Date:

    Jun 15 2017

  • Source:
    Clin Infect Dis. 64(12):1670-1677
  • Language:
    English
Filetype[PDF-193.88 KB]


Details:
  • Alternative Title:
    Clin Infect Dis
  • Description:
    Background Evidence-based recommendations for treating persons having presumed latent tuberculosis (LTBI) after contact to infectious multidrug-resistant (MDR) tuberculosis (TB) are lacking because published data consist of small observational studies. Tuberculosis incidence in persons treated for latent MDR -TB infection is unknown. Methods We conducted a systematic review of studies published 1 January 1994–31 December 2014 to analyze TB incidence, treatment completion and discontinuation, and cost-effectiveness. We considered contacts with LTBI effectively treated if they were on ≥1 medication to which their MDR-TB strain was likely susceptible. We selected studies that compared treatment vs nontreatment outcomes and performed a meta-analysis to estimate the relative risk of TB incidence and its 95% confidence interval. Results We abstracted data from 21 articles that met inclusion criteria. Six articles presented outcomes for contacts who were treated compared with those not treated for MDR-LTBI; 10 presented outcomes only for treated contacts, and 5 presented outcomes only for untreated contacts. The estimated MDR-TB incidence reduction was 90% (9%–99%) using data from 5 comparison studies. We also found high treatment discontinuation rates due to adverse effects in persons taking pyrazinamide-containing regimens. Cost-effectiveness was greatest using a fluoroquinolone/ethambutol combination regimen. Conclusions Few studies met inclusion criteria, therefore results should be cautiously interpreted. We found a reduced risk of TB incidence with treatment for MDR-LTBI, suggesting effectiveness in prevention of progression to MDR-TB, and confirmed cost-effectiveness. However, we found that pyrazinamide-containing MDR-LTBI regimens often resulted in treatment discontinuation due to adverse effects.
  • Pubmed ID:
    28329197
  • Pubmed Central ID:
    PMC5543758
  • Document Type:
  • Collection(s):
  • Main Document Checksum:
  • File Type:
No Related Documents.

You May Also Like: