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A Pilot Study of Healthy Living Options at 16 Truck Stops Across the United States
  • Published Date:
    September 28 2016
  • Source:
    Am J Health Promot. 32(3):546-553
  • Language:
    English
Filetype[PDF-381.00 KB]


Details:
  • Alternative Title:
    Am J Health Promot
  • Description:
    Purpose

    There is a growing body of evidence that the built environment influences diet and exercise and, as a consequence, community health status. Since long-haul truck drivers spend long periods of time at truck stops, it is important to know if this built environment includes resources that contribute to the emotional and physical well-being of drivers.

    Setting

    The truck stop environment was defined as the truck stop itself, grocery stores, and medical clinics near the truck stop that could be accessed by a large truck or safely on foot.

    Design

    Researchers at the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) developed and utilized a checklist to record the availability of resources for personal hygiene and comfort, communication and mental stimulation, health care, safety, physical activity, and nutrition at truck stops.

    Subjects

    The NIOSH checklist was used to collect data at a convenience sample of 16 truck stops throughout the United States along both high-flow and low-flow truck traffic routes.

    Measures

    The checklist was completed by observation within and around the truck stops.

    Results

    No truck stops offered exercise facilities, 94% lacked access to health care, 81% lacked a walking path, 50% lacked fresh fruit, and 37% lacked fresh vegetables in their restaurant or convenience store.

    Conclusion

    The NIOSH found that most truck stops did not provide an overall healthy living environment.

  • Pubmed ID:
    27687618
  • Pubmed Central ID:
    PMC5373917
  • Document Type:
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