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Intergenerational Continuity in Cannabis Use: The Role of Parent's Early Onset and Lifetime Disorder on Child's Early Onset
  • Published Date:
    Nov 09 2016
  • Source:
    J Adolesc Health. 60(1):87-92.


Public Access Version Available on: January 01, 2018 information icon
Please check back on the date listed above.
Details:
  • Pubmed ID:
    27838235
  • Pubmed Central ID:
    PMC5333989
  • Funding:
    R01 CE001572/CE/NCIPC CDC HHS/United States
    R01 DA020195/DA/NIDA NIH HHS/United States
    R01 MH056486/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/United States
    R01 MH063386/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/United States
  • Document Type:
  • Collection(s):
  • Description:
    Purpose

    Children's early onset of cannabis use was examined as a function of their parent's early onset of cannabis and subsequent incidence of a lifetime cannabis abuse or dependence disorder.

    Methods

    Prospective, longitudinal data from the Rochester Youth Development Study (RYDS) and the Rochester Intergenerational Study (RIGS) for 442 parent-child dyads (274 father-child, 168 mother-child) were utilized. The children were evenly split by sex. Logistic regression models and a path analysis were estimated to assess the effect of parent's cannabis use on child's onset of cannabis by age 15.

    Results

    Fathers who began using cannabis by age 15 were more likely to meet the criteria for a lifetime cannabis disorder (O.R. = 5.66, 95% CI = 1.89, 16.90). The offspring of fathers who met the criteria for a disorder had higher odds of early initiation of cannabis use (O.R. = 9.70, 95% CI = 3.00, 31.34). Early onset cannabis use by father was indirectly associated with their child's onset of cannabis use via father's lifetime cannabis disorder. No significant effects for mothers were observed, although analyseswere limited due to the low rate of mothers who met the criteria for a lifetime cannabis disorder.

    Conclusions

    This study provides evidence of intergenerational continuity in cannabis use among fathers and their children and confirms the need to consider timing of use and intervening mechanisms in the study of continuity in cannabis use across generations.

  • Supporting Files:
    No Additional Files