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Association of peripartum synthetic oxytocin administration and depressive and anxiety disorders within the first postpartum year
  • Published Date:
    Feb 2017
  • Source:
    Depress Anxiety. 34(2):137-146.


Public Access Version Available on: February 01, 2018 information icon
Please check back on the date listed above.
Details:
  • Pubmed ID:
    28133901
  • Pubmed Central ID:
    PMC5310833
  • Funding:
    K99 HD059943/HD/NICHD NIH HHS/United States
    R00 HD059943/HD/NICHD NIH HHS/United States
    UL1 TR000161/TR/NCATS NIH HHS/United States
    U01 DP006093/DP/NCCDPHP CDC HHS/United States
    K23 MH097794/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/United States
    L30 MH104713/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/United States
    F32 MH108247/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/United States
  • Document Type:
  • Collection(s):
  • Description:
    Background

    Due to its potent effects on social behavior, including maternal behavior, oxytocin has been identified as a potential mediator of postpartum depression and anxiety. The objective of this study was to examine the relationship between peripartum synthetic oxytocin administration and the development of depressive and anxiety disorders within the first year postpartum. We hypothesized that women exposed to peripartum synthetic oxytocin would have a reduced risk of postpartum depressive and anxiety disorders compared with those without any exposure.

    Methods

    Population-based data available through the Massachusetts Integrated Clinical Academic Research Database (MiCARD) was used to retrospectively (2005–2014) examine this relationship and calculate the relative risk of peripartum synthetic oxytocin for the development of postpartum depressive and anxiety disorders in exposed (n=9,684) compared to unexposed (n=37,048) deliveries.

    Results

    Among deliveries to women with a history of prepregnancy depressive or anxiety disorder, exposure to peripartum oxytocin increased the risk of postpartum depressive or anxiety disorder by 36% (RR: 1.36; 95%CI: 1.20–1.55). In deliveries to women with no history of prepregnancy depressive or anxiety disorder, exposure to peripartum oxytocin increased the risk of postpartum depressive or anxiety disorder by 32% compared to those not exposed (RR: 1.32; 95% CI: 1.23–1.42).

    Conclusions

    Contrary to our hypothesis, results indicate that women with peripartum exposure to synthetic oxytocin had a higher relative risk of receiving a documented depressive or anxiety disorder diagnosis or antidepressant/anxiolytic prescription within the first year postpartum than women without synthetic oxytocin exposure.

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