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Surveillance of invasive bacterial disease in Alaska, 2000
  • Published Date:
    4/17/2003
  • Language:
    English
Filetype[PDF - 294.73 KB]


Details:
  • Corporate Authors:
    National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (U.S.). Division of Division of Preparedness and Emerging Infections. Arctic Investigations Program.
  • Document Type:
  • Description:
    Summary -- Introduction -- Invasive Pneumococcal Disease -- Invasive Haemophilus influenzae -- Invasive Neisseria meningitidis -- Invasive Group A Streptococcus -- Invasive Group B Streptococcus -- References -- Appendix: MIC Interpretive Standards Definitions.

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Arctic Investigations Program (AIP) in Anchorage, Alaska, maintains a statewide surveillance system for invasive diseases caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, Neisseria meningitidis, and Groups A and B Streptococci. Laboratories throughout the state are requested to send to AIP any isolates of these organisms recovered from a blood culture, CSF, or other normally sterile site. Isolate identification is confirmed and, when appropriate, serotyped and tested for antimicrobial susceptibility. The objectives of this system are to provide information on disease rates within the state, monitor the emergence of antimicrobial resistance, and to monitor the effectiveness of implemented vaccine programs, such as the 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine, the 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine and Haemophilus influenzae type b vaccines.

    In 2000, the total number of cases of invasive disease caused by these organisms reported to AIP were 125 S. pneumoniae, 16 H. influenzae, 9 N. meningitidis, 18 Group A Strep and 18 Group B Strep. Alaska Native populations had higher rates of disease than non-Native populations in all invasive disease except those caused by Group B Strep. Rates of invasive pneumococcal disease were highest in the YK Delta and Kotzebue regions; H. influenzae rates were highest in Bristol Bay and Norton Sound.

  • Supporting Files:
    No Additional Files