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Perceived weight status and weight change among a U.S. adult sample
  • Published Date:
    Nov 15 2016
  • Source:
    Obesity (Silver Spring). 25(1):223-228.


Public Access Version Available on: January 01, 2018 information icon
Please check back on the date listed above.
Details:
  • Pubmed ID:
    27863126
  • Pubmed Central ID:
    PMC5182114
  • Description:
    Objectives

    Examine bi-directional associations between weight perception and weight change over time among adults.

    Methods

    Data are from adult employees (N=623) across 12 U.S. public high schools participating in a cluster-randomized multilevel weight gain prevention intervention. Data were collected at baseline, 12 months, and 24 months. Perceived weight status (very/somewhat underweight, just right, somewhat overweight, very overweight) were obtained via self-administered surveys. Weight (kg) was measured by trained staff. Change in weight was calculated as the difference between baseline weight and weight at each follow-up timepoint. Structural equation models were used to assess bi-directional associations of perceived weight status and change in weight over time. Models adjusted for study condition, gender, age, race/ethnicity, education level and previous timepoint.

    Results

    The sample was 65% female with a mean age of 44.6 (SD=11.3). Nearly two thirds of the sample consisted of people with overweight (38.8%) or obesity (27.3%). Structural equation models indicated that baseline weight predicted subsequent perceived weight status (β=.26; p<.001), whereas baseline perceived weight status did not predict subsequent change in weight, adjusting for previous timepoint and covariates.

    Conclusions

    Results do not support bi-directional causality between weight perception and weight change in an adult sample.

  • Document Type:
  • Collection(s):
  • Funding:
    K01 DK102447/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/United States
    R01 CA132941/CA/NCI NIH HHS/United States
    U48 DP001933/DP/NCCDPHP CDC HHS/United States
    U48 DP005031/DP/NCCDPHP CDC HHS/United States
    T32 HL120823/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/United States
  • Supporting Files:
    No Additional Files
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