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Prevalence and trends of leisure-time physical activity by occupation and industry in U.S. workers: the National Health Interview Survey 2004–2014
Filetype[PDF - 395.64 KB]


Details:
  • Pubmed ID:
    27659584
  • Pubmed Central ID:
    PMC5109053
  • Funding:
    CC999999/Intramural CDC HHS/United States
  • Document Type:
  • Collection(s):
  • Description:
    Purpose

    Studies describing prevalence and trends of physical activity among workers in the United States are scarce. We aimed to estimate prevalence and trends of “sufficient” leisure-time physical activity (LTPA) during the 2004–2014 time period among U.S. workers.

    Methods

    Data were collected for U.S. workers in the National Health Interview Survey. LTPA was categorized as sufficiently active (moderate intensity, ≥150 minutes per week), insufficiently active (10–149 minutes per week), and inactive (<10 minutes per week). Prevalence of LTPA was adjusted for age using 2010 U.S. working population as a standardized age distribution.

    Results

    Prevalence trends of “sufficient” LTPA significantly increased from 2004 to 2014 (45.6% to 54.8%; P < .001). Among industry groups, the highest prevalence of “sufficient” LTPA was observed among workers in Professional/Scientific/Technical Services (62.1%). The largest increases were observed among workers in Public Administration (51.3%–63.4%). Among occupational groups, “sufficient” LTPA prevalence was lowest in farming/fishing/forestry (30.8%) and highest in life/physical/social science (66.4%). Prevalence of LTPA significantly increased from 2004 to 2014 in most occupational and industry groups.

    Conclusions

    Among U.S. workers, trends of “sufficient” LTPA significantly increased between 2004 and 2014. Overall, a larger proportion of white-collar compared to blue-collar workers were engaged in “sufficient” LTPA.