Welcome to CDC Stacks | Characteristics of Youth with Combined Histories of Violent Behavior, Suicidal Ideation or Behavior, and Gun-Carrying - 43195 | CDC Public Access
Stacks Logo
Advanced Search
Select up to three search categories and corresponding keywords using the fields to the right. Refer to the Help section for more detailed instructions.
 
 
Help
Clear All Simple Search
Advanced Search
Characteristics of Youth with Combined Histories of Violent Behavior, Suicidal Ideation or Behavior, and Gun-Carrying
  • Published Date:
    Jun 01 2016
  • Source:
    Crisis. 37(6):402-414.


Public Access Version Available on: November 01, 2017 information icon
Please check back on the date listed above.
Details:
  • Pubmed ID:
    27245809
  • Pubmed Central ID:
    PMC5133189
  • Funding:
    CC999999/Intramural CDC HHS/United States
  • Document Type:
  • Collection(s):
  • Description:
    Background

    Youth reporting combined histories of nonfatal violence, suicidal ideation/behavior, and gun-carrying (VSG) are at risk for perpetrating fatal interpersonal violence and self-harm.

    Aims

    We characterize these youth to inform prevention efforts.

    Methods

    We analyzed 2004 data from 3,931 7th, 9th, and 11–12th grade youth and compared VSG youth (n=66) to non-gun carrying youth who either had no histories of violence or suicidal thoughts/behavior (n=1,839), histories of violence (n=884), histories of suicidal thoughts/behaviors (n=552), or both (n=590). We compared groups based on demographic factors, risk factors (i.e., friends who engage in delinquency, peer-violence victimization, depressive symptoms, illicit substance use), and protective factors (i.e., school connectedness, parental care and supervision). Regression models identified factors associated with VSG youth.

    Results

    Illicit substance use and having friends who engage in delinquency were more common among VSG youth in all comparisons; almost all VSG youth had high-levels of these factors. Depressive symptoms were positively associated with VSG youth versus youth without either violent or suicide-related histories and youth with violent histories alone. School connectedness and parental supervision were negatively associated with VSG youth in most comparisons.

    Conclusions

    Family-focused and school-based interventions that increase connectedness while reducing delinquency and substance use might prevent these violent tendencies.

  • Supporting Files:
    No Additional Files