Welcome to CDC Stacks | A Malaria survey of the Santee-Cooper Reservoir, South Carolina : an abbreviated report by the South Carolina State Board of Health and the Office of Maralia Control in War Areas, U.S. Public Health Service. - 42852 | David J. Sencer CDC Museum
Stacks Logo
Advanced Search
Select up to three search categories and corresponding keywords using the fields to the right. Refer to the Help section for more detailed instructions.
 
 
Help
Clear All Simple Search
Advanced Search
A Malaria survey of the Santee-Cooper Reservoir, South Carolina : an abbreviated report by the South Carolina State Board of Health and the Office of Maralia Control in War Areas, U.S. Public Health Service.
  • Published Date:
    1945
  • Language:
    English
Filetype[PDF - 266.84 MB]


This document cannot be previewed automatically as it exceeds 5 MB
Please click the download button to view the document.
A Malaria survey of the Santee-Cooper Reservoir, South Carolina : an abbreviated report by the South Carolina State Board of Health and the Office of Maralia Control in War Areas, U.S. Public Health Service.
Details:
  • Document Type:
  • Description:
    Malaria has long been a serious problem in the "low country" or coastal plain region of South Carolina, particularly in the Santee River Basin of that State. In studying records collected from this area over the last ten years, it is evident that a clear-cut focus of malaria has existed and continues to exist in the vicinity of the Santee River in Clarendon, Berkeley, and Orangeburg Counties. Furthermore, these studies have indicated that in some sections malaria has increased since the 1941 impoundage of water on the Pinopolis and Santee Basins, and that minor epidemics have occurred during the seasons of 1942 and 1943 in Clarendon County near the Santee Reservoir.

    Realizing the seriousness of the malaria problem in the area adjacent to the two reservoirs, the South Carolina State Board of Health and the South Carolina Public Service Authority prepared a report, early in 1944, summarizing the malaria problem around the Santee-Cooper impoundment and requested the aid of the U. S. Public Health Service in controlling the disease.

    After conferring with the Surgeon General, it was proposed that an intensive survey of the area be made to secure additional data that might form the basis for a control program. The survey was to include epidemiological, entomological, and engineering studies and was designed to furnish complete data on the reservoirs and adjacent territory.

    An epidemiological survey was to secure information to supplement and confirm that already existing regarding prevalence and distribution of the disease. It would compile and tabulate the available data on malaria incidence and would organize and direct a blood smear survey in the area immediately adjacent to the reservoirs.

    The entomologists were to outline, in detail, the most favorable breeding places for Anopheles quadrimaculatus and were to further determine whether the principal breeding of quadrimaculatus was occurring in the reservoirs.proper or in adjoining territory. They would also study the flight range, dispersal, and other important features of the biology of the vector in this area.

    An engineering survey was to obtain more detailed data on the most feasible control methods to be employed on (1) a short-range program and (2) on a long- range malaria control program over the whole area.

  • Supporting Files:
    No Additional Files