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The Role of Occupational Status in the Association between Job Strain and Ambulatory Blood Pressure during Working and Nonworking Days
  • Published Date:
    Oct 2016
  • Source:
    Psychosom Med. 78(8):940-949.


Public Access Version Available on: October 01, 2017 information icon
Please check back on the date listed above.
Details:
  • Pubmed ID:
    27359177
  • Pubmed Central ID:
    PMC5067969
  • Funding:
    CC999999/Intramural CDC HHS/United States
    P01 HL040962/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/United States
    T32 HL007560/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/United States
  • Document Type:
  • Collection(s):
  • Description:
    Objective

    The objectives of this study were to determine whether job strain is more strongly associated with higher ambulatory blood pressure (ABP) among blue-collar workers compared to white-collar workers; to examine whether this pattern generalizes across working and nonworking days and across sex; and to examine whether this pattern is accounted for by psychosocial factors or health behaviors during daily life.

    Methods

    480 healthy workers (mean age = 43; 53% female)in the Adult Health and Behavior Project – Phase 2 (AHAB-II)completed ABP monitoring during 3 working days and 1 nonworking day. Job strain was operationalized as high psychological demand (> sample median) combined with low decision latitude (< sample median) (Karasek model; Job Content Questionnaire).

    Results

    Covariate-adjusted multilevel random coefficients regressions demonstrated that associations between job strain and systolic and diastolic ABP were stronger among blue-collar workers compared to white-collar workers (b = 6.53, F(1, 464)= 3.89, p = .049 and b = 5.25, F(1, 464)= 6.09, p = .014, respectively). This pattern did not vary by sex but diastolic ABP findings were stronger when participants were at work. The stronger association between job strain and ABP among blue-collar workers was not accounted for by education, momentary physical activity or substance use, but was partially accounted for by covariation between higher hostility and blue-collar status.

    Conclusions

    Job strain is associated with ABP among blue-collar workers. These results extend previous findings to a mixed-sex sample and nonworking days and provide, for the first time, comprehensive exploration of several behavioral and psychosocial explanations for this finding.

  • Supporting Files:
    No Additional Files