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Sleep duration and diet quality among women within 5 years of childbirth in the United States- a cross-sectional study
  • Published Date:
    Sep 2016
  • Source:
    Matern Child Health J. 20(9):1869-1877.


Public Access Version Available on: September 01, 2017 information icon
Please check back on the date listed above.
Details:
  • Pubmed ID:
    27090412
  • Pubmed Central ID:
    PMC5007202
  • Funding:
    UL1 TR000161/TR/NCATS NIH HHS/United States
    K24 HL124366/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/United States
    U01 DP006093/DP/NCCDPHP CDC HHS/United States
    U01 HL105268/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/United States
    KL2 TR000160/TR/NCATS NIH HHS/United States
  • Document Type:
  • Collection(s):
  • Description:
    Objective

    Only 9% of women with young children consume a high quality diet. The association between sleep duration and health may be U-shaped. We examined diet quality in relation to sleep duration among U.S. women within 5 years of childbirth.

    Methods

    Data were from non-pregnant women aged 20-44 years within 5 years of childbirth who completed two 24-hour dietary recalls (N=896) in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2005-2012. Self-reported weekday/workday sleep duration was categorized as short (≤6 hours), adequate (7-8 hours), or long (≥9 hours). The Healthy Eating Index (HEI-2010, range: 0-100) estimated overall and components of diet quality. Multivariable-adjusted linear regression models estimated the association between sleep duration and diet quality, adjusting for age, race/ethnicity, and education.

    Results

    Thirty-four percent of women reported short, 57.1% adequate, and 8.6% long sleep duration. The average diet quality total score was 47.4 out of 100. Short sleep duration was not associated with diet quality. Long sleep duration was associated with lower quality diet (β = −4.3; 95% CI: −8.1 - −0.4), lower consumption of total fruit (β = −0.7; 95% CI: −1.3 - −0.1), whole fruit (β = −0.9; 95% CI: −1.6 - −0.2), and total protein (β = −0.7; 95% CI: −1.3 - −0.03), and higher consumption of empty calories (β = 2.2; 95% CI: −4.3 - −0.1).

    Conclusions for Practice

    Future studies should examine the longitudinal association between sleep duration and diet quality among women following childbirth and whether interventions to improve sleep can enhance diet quality.

  • Supporting Files:
    No Additional Files