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Estimating tuberculosis cases and their economic costs averted in the United States over the past two decades
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Details:
  • Pubmed ID:
    27287646
  • Pubmed Central ID:
    PMC4992985
  • Description:
    BACKGROUND

    Following a concerted public health response to the resurgence of tuberculosis (TB) in the United States in the late 1980s, annual TB incidence decreased substantially. However, no estimates exist of the number and cost savings of TB cases averted.

    METHODS

    TB cases averted in the United States during 1995–2014 were estimated: Scenario 1 used a static 1992 case rate; Scenario 2 applied the 1992 rate to foreign-born cases, and a pre-resurgence 5.1% annual decline to US-born cases; and a statistical model assessed human immunodeficiency virus and TB program indices. We applied the cost of illness to estimate the societal benefits (costs averted) in 2014 dollars.

    RESULTS

    During 1992–2014, 368 184 incident TB cases were reported, and cases decreased by two thirds during that period. In the scenarios and statistical model, TB cases averted during 1995–2014 ranged from approximately 145 000 to 319 000. The societal benefits of averted TB cases ranged from US$3.1 to US$6.7 billion, excluding deaths, and from US$6.7 to US$14.5 billion, including deaths.

    CONCLUSIONS

    Coordinated efforts in TB control and prevention in the United States yielded a remarkable number of TB cases averted and societal economic benefits. We illustrate the value of concerted action and targeted public health funding.

  • Document Type:
  • Collection(s):
  • Funding:
    CC999999/Intramural CDC HHS/United States
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