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A television in the bedroom is associated with higher weekday screen time among youth with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADD/ADHD)
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Details:
  • Pubmed ID:
    25599016
  • Pubmed Central ID:
    PMC4292909
  • Description:
    OBJECTIVE

    A TV in the bedroom has been associated with screen time in youth. Youth with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADD/ADHD) have higher rates of screen time, but associations with bedroom TVs are unknown in this population. We examined the association of having a bedroom TV with screen time among youth with ADD/ADHD.

    METHODS

    Data were from the 2007 National Survey of Children’s Health. Youth 6-17 years whose parent/guardian reported a physician’s diagnosis of ADD/ADHD (n = 7,024) were included in the analysis. Parents/guardians reported the presence of a bedroom TV and average weekday TV screen time. Multivariate linear and logistic regression models assessed the effects of a bedroom on screen time.

    RESULTS

    Youth with ADD/ADHD engaged in screen time an average of 149.1 minutes/weekday and 59% had a TV in their bedroom. Adjusting for child and family characteristics, having a TV in the bedroom was associated with 25 minutes higher daily screen time (95% CI: 12.8-37.4 min/day). A bedroom TV was associated with 32% higher odds of engaging in screen time for over 2 hours/day (OR=1.3; 95% CI: 1.0-1.7).

    CONCLUSION

    Future research should explore whether removing TVs from bedrooms reduces screen time among youth with ADD/ADHD.

  • Document Type:
  • Collection(s):
  • Funding:
    K24 HL124366/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/United States
    KL2 TR000160/TR/NCATS NIH HHS/United States
    U01 HL105268/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/United States
    U48 DP001903/DP/NCCDPHP CDC HHS/United States
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