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Association of Streptomyces community composition determined by PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis with indoor mold status
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Details:
  • Pubmed ID:
    25331035
  • Pubmed Central ID:
    PMC4255558
  • Funding:
    ES10957/ES/NIEHS NIH HHS/United States
    R01 ES011170/ES/NIEHS NIH HHS/United States
    ES11170/ES/NIEHS NIH HHS/United States
    T32 ES010957/ES/NIEHS NIH HHS/United States
    T42 OH008432/OH/NIOSH CDC HHS/United States
  • Document Type:
  • Collection(s):
  • Description:
    Both Streptomyces species and mold species have previously been isolated from moisture-damaged building materials; however, an association between these two groups of microorganisms in indoor environments is not clear. In this study, we used a culture-independent method, PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE), to investigate the composition of the Streptomyces community in house dust. Twenty-three dust samples each from two sets of homes categorized as high-mold and low-mold based on mold-specific quantitative PCR analysis were used in the study. Taxonomic identification of prominent bands was performed by cloning and sequencing. Associations between DGGE amplicon band intensities and home mold status were assessed using univariate analyses as well as multivariate recursive partitioning (decision trees) to test the predictive value of combinations of bands intensities. In the final classification tree, a combination of two bands was significantly associated with mold status of the home (pā€‰=ā€‰0.001). The sequence corresponding to one of the bands in the final decision tree matched a group of Streptomyces species that included Streptomyces coelicolor and Streptomyces sampsonii, both of which have been isolated from moisture-damaged buildings previously. The closest match for the majority of sequences corresponding to a second band consisted of a group of Streptomyces species that included Streptomyces hygroscopicus, an important producer of antibiotics and immunosuppressors. Taken together, the study showed that DGGE can be a useful tool for identifying bacterial species that may be more prevalent in mold-damaged buildings.