Welcome to CDC Stacks | Asking Youth Questions About Suicide Risk in the Pediatric Emergency Department: Results From a Qualitative Analysis of Patient Opinions - 41903 | CDC Public Access
Stacks Logo
Advanced Search
Select up to three search categories and corresponding keywords using the fields to the right. Refer to the Help section for more detailed instructions.
 
 
Help
Clear All Simple Search
Advanced Search
Asking Youth Questions About Suicide Risk in the Pediatric Emergency Department: Results From a Qualitative Analysis of Patient Opinions
Filetype[PDF - 292.11 KB]


Details:
  • Pubmed ID:
    23908599
  • Pubmed Central ID:
    PMC3725561
  • Funding:
    K01 MH069948/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/United States
    R01 CE002129/CE/NCIPC CDC HHS/United States
    R01 MH093552/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/United States
    Z99 MH999999/Intramural NIH HHS/United States
  • Document Type:
  • Collection(s):
  • Description:
    The emergency department (ED) is a promising setting to screen youth for suicide risk. Patient reactions to questions about suicidal thoughts and behaviors during their ED visit have implications for how screening is introduced, developed, and implemented. The current study is a qualitative investigation into patient opinions about screening for suicide risk in the pediatric ED. As part of a subset of a multisite study, 165 participants, 10 to 21 years old, were included in this sub-analysis. Ninety percent (148/165) of participants supported suicide risk screening. Reasons youth support screening included prevention of suicide, detection of at-risk youth, and a lack of other social support. Overall, pediatric patients agreed with suicide risk screening in the ED, citing similar reasons as in a previous investigation, further demonstrating acceptability of suicide risk screening in this setting. A small subset of youth (10%; 17/165) did not support screening for reasons that included a desire to focus on their chief (i.e., nonpsychiatric) presenting concern and fear of iatrogenic risk. Understanding patient opinions, including those in support of and in opposition to screening, can inform implementation practices. Further education about the importance of suicide risk assessment may be a helpful first step in instituting universal screening efforts.