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Bulletin of Field Training Programs : January 1-December 31, 1949
  • Published Date:
    1949
  • Language:
    English
Filetype[PDF - 40.55 MB]


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Bulletin of Field Training Programs : January 1-December 31, 1949
Details:
  • Document Type:
  • Description:
    The primary purpose of the Training Division during the past two years has been to develop and improve techniques of field training for public health personnel. To that end, regional field training centers have been established in the southeastern, the northeastern, and the mid-western sections of the country.

    State health departments in Georgia, Kansas, and New York, have assisted with the development, maintenance and operation of these field training centers to which a corps of trained and experienced field training teachers were assigned by the Training Division, i Field training in the following categories has been carried on at the Georgia regional centers during 1947 and 1948: In Savannah-Chatham County - field training of health educators and public health records personnel, in Columbus-Muscogee County - field training for graduate sanitary engineers and sanitarians, in the City of Atlanta - field training in rodent and insect control and j housing evaluation tecliniques, in Albanv-Rougherty County - field training in malaria control and basic sanitation for foreign trainees, also for sanitary engineers and sanitarians.

    Cooperation by the Georgia Department of Public Health and certain outstanding city-county health departments in Georgia has made it possible to successfully operate these field training centers. Without the sympathetic and enthusiastic support of the directors of these health departments, no effective field training could have been carried on by the Public Health Service to assist the states in the southeastern portion of the country. Professors of sanitary engineering from Columbia University and from the University of Missouri have worked on the staff at the Columbus Field Training Center during 1947 and 1948 assisting with the correlation of field training with academic studies. Graduates from the Georgia Institute of Technology, Harvard University, Johns Hopkins University, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, University of Michigan, University of North Carolina, and Purdue University, have completed three months in field training at Columbus, Georgia.

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