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EFFECT OF WEARING AN N95 FILTERING FACEPIECE RESPIRATOR ON SUPEROMEDIAL ORBITAL INFRARED INDIRECT BRAIN TEMPERATURE MEASUREMENTS
  • Published Date:
    Jan 13 2016
  • Source:
    J Clin Monit Comput. 31(1):67-73.


Public Access Version Available on: February 01, 2018 information icon
Please check back on the date listed above.
Details:
  • Pubmed ID:
    26759336
  • Pubmed Central ID:
    PMC4942410
  • Description:
    Purpose

    To determine any effect of wearing a filtering facepiece respirator on brain temperature.

    Methods

    Subjects (n=18) wore a filtering facepiece respirator (FFR) for 1h at rest while undergoing infrared thermography measurements of the superomedial periobital region of the eye, a non-invasive indirect method of brain temperature measurements we termed the superomedial orbital infrared indirect brain temperature (SOIIBT) measurement. Temperature of the facial skin covered by the FFR, infrared temperature measurements of the tympanic membrane and superficial temporal artery region were concurrently measured, and subjective impressions of thermal comfort obtained simultaneously.

    Results

    The temperature of the skin under the FFR and subjective impressions of thermal discomfort both increased significantly. The mean tympanic membrane temperature did not increase, and the superficial temporal artery region temperature decreased significantly. The SOIIBT values did not change significantly, but subjects who switched from nasal to oronasal breathing during the study (n=5) experienced a slight increase in the SOIIBT measurements.

    Conclusions

    Wearing a FFR for 1h at rest does not have a significant effect on brain temperatures, as evaluated by the SOIIBT measurements, but a change in the route of breathing may impact these measurements. These findings suggest that subjective impressions of thermal discomfort from wearing a FFR under the study conditions are more likely the result of local dermal sensations rather than brain warming.

  • Document Type:
  • Collection(s):
  • Funding:
    CC999999/Intramural CDC HHS/United States
  • Supporting Files:
    No Additional Files
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