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CDC grants will help improve hurricane response and recovery
  • Published Date:
    3/17/14
  • Language:
    English
Filetype[PDF - 235.20 KB]


Details:
  • Corporate Authors:
    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U.S.). Office of Public Health Preparedness and Response.
  • Series:
    CDC PHPR fact sheet
  • Description:
    It’s a familiar sight – cars floating in murky water, debris littered in fields and houses half collapsed from the tremendous force of water and wind. These were the images after Hurricane Sandy racked the northeast coast in the fall of 2012 – the second costliest hurricane in U.S. history. A year later, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), along with the Department of Health and Human Services’ (HHS) Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response, are providing money to find effective ways to help health systems and communities hit hardest by the storm recover.

    Funded under the Hurricane Sandy Recovery and Rebuilding Supplemental Appropriations Act of 2013, this two-year research grant program represents the first time HHS has been able to fund research needed by local communities to determine the best ways to prepare for and recover from natural disasters like hurricanes. CDC awarded $7.1 million to 13 grantees who will focus on four priority areas: mold mitigation and related health issues; characterization of death and disease after the hurricane; health hazard exposure, recognition, and mitigation among response workers and volunteers; and evaluation of public health systems response.

    The results of this research will enhance the recovery process and contribute to the resiliency of this region and its communities to withstand future public health threats. Information from these studies is expected to provide insight on how to adapt and sustain our public health and health care systems during an event like this. In addition, the results can immediately be applied to communities recovering from similar events.

    Publication date from document properties

    cdc_sandy_grant_fact_sheet.pdf

  • Supporting Files:
    No Additional Files