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The implications of megatrends in information and communication technology and transportation for changes in global physical activity
Filetype[PDF - 1023.06 KB]


Details:
  • Corporate Authors:
    Lancet Physical Activity Series Working Group
  • Pubmed ID:
    22818940
  • Pubmed Central ID:
    PMC4843126
  • Funding:
    MC_U106179473/Medical Research Council/United Kingdom
    MC_U106179474/Medical Research Council/United Kingdom
    MC_U106188470/Medical Research Council/United Kingdom
    P30 DK092950/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/United States
    P50 CA095815/CA/NCI NIH HHS/United States
    U48 DP000060/DP/NCCDPHP CDC HHS/United States
    U48/DP001903/DP/NCCDPHP CDC HHS/United States
    British Heart Foundation/United Kingdom
    Medical Research Council/United Kingdom
    Wellcome Trust/United Kingdom
  • Document Type:
  • Collection(s):
  • Description:
    Physical inactivity accounts for more than 3 million deaths per year, most from non-communicable diseases in low-income and middle-income countries. We used reviews of physical activity interventions and a simulation model to examine how megatrends in information and communication technology and transportation directly and indirectly affect levels of physical activity across countries of low, middle, and high income. The model suggested that the direct and potentiating eff ects of information and communication technology, especially mobile phones, are nearly equal in magnitude to the mean eff ects of planned physical activity interventions. The greatest potential to increase population physical activity might thus be in creation of synergistic policies in sectors outside health including communication and transportation. However, there remains a glaring mismatch between where studies on physical activity interventions are undertaken and where the potential lies in low-income and middle-income countries for population-level effects that will truly affect global health.