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Travel-associated Zika virus disease cases among U.S. residents — United States, January 2015–February 2016
Filetype[PDF - 326.89 KB]


Details:
  • Pubmed ID:
    27023833
  • Series:
    MMWR. Morbidity and mortality weekly report ; v. 65, no. 11, p. 286-289
  • Document Type:
  • Description:
    On March 18, 2016, this report was posted as an MMWR Early Release on the MMWR website.

    Zika virus is an emerging mosquito-borne flavivirus. Recent outbreaks of Zika virus disease in the Pacific Islands and the Region of the Americas have identified new modes of transmission and clinical manifestations, including adverse pregnancy outcomes. However, data on the epidemiology and clinical findings of laboratory-confirmed Zika virus disease remain limited. During January 1, 2015-February 26, 2016, a total of 116 residents of 33 U.S. states and the District of Columbia had laboratory evidence of recent Zika virus infection based on testing performed at CDC. Cases include one congenital infection and 115 persons who reported recent travel to areas with active Zika virus transmission (n = 110) or sexual contact with such a traveler (n = 5). All 115 patients had clinical illness, with the most common signs and symptoms being rash (98%; n = 113), fever (82%; 94), and arthralgia (66%; 76). Health care providers should educate patients, particularly pregnant women, about the risks for, and measures to prevent, infection with Zika virus and other mosquito-borne viruses. Zika virus disease should be considered in patients with acute onset of fever, rash, arthralgia, or conjunctivitis, who traveled to areas with ongoing Zika virus transmission (http://www.cdc.gov/zika/geo/index.html) or who had unprotected sex with a person who traveled to one of those areas and developed compatible symptoms within 2 weeks of returning.

    Suggested citation for this article: Armstrong P, Hennessey M, Adams M, et al. Travel-Associated Zika Virus Disease Cases Among U.S. Residents — United States, January 2015–February 2016. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep 2016;65:286–289. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.15585/mmwr.mm6511e1.

    PMID: 27023833

    mm6511e1.pdf

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