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STRESS EATING AND SLEEP DISTURBANCE AS MEDIATORS IN THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN DEPRESSION AND OBESITY IN LOW-INCOME, MINORITY WOMEN
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Details:
  • Pubmed ID:
    26324859
  • Pubmed Central ID:
    PMC4769965
  • Funding:
    P30 DK020541/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/United States
    P30 ES023515/ES/NIEHS NIH HHS/United States
    R24 MD001691/MD/NIMHD NIH HHS/United States
    U58 DP001010/DP/NCCDPHP CDC HHS/United States
  • Document Type:
  • Description:
    The purpose of this study was to explore potential mediators of the relationship between depression and obesity in a sample of low-income, minority women. Data were extracted from a sample of 535 women enrolled in a weight loss intervention for the prevention of type 2 diabetes. Using a non-parametric bootstrapping procedure, the potential mediation effects of stress eating and sleep disturbance on the relationship between depression and obesity were tested. Results of a single mediation model indicated that depressive symptomatology was significantly associated with obesity (β=0.800, SE=0.290, p=0.006), and that stress eating (β=0.166, 95% CI [0.046, 0.328]) and sleep disturbance (β=1.032, 95% CI [0.612, 1.427]) were significant independent mediators of this relationship. Sleep disturbance remained a significant mediator in a combined mediation model (β=1.009, 95% CI [0.653, 1.399]). Findings add to the growing literature on the psychosocial factors implicated in the link between depression and obesity, particularly among disadvantaged populations. Future longitudinal research should aim to establish causal pathways between obesity, stress eating, sleep disturbance, and depression.