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Racial and Ethnic Heterogeneity in Self-Reported Diabetes Prevalence Trends Across Hispanic Subgroups, National Health Interview Survey, 1997–2012
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Details:
  • Pubmed ID:
    26796518
  • Pubmed Central ID:
    PMC4722936
  • Funding:
    T32HL067702/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/United States
    P20MD000272/MD/NIMHD NIH HHS/United States
    P20 MD000272/MD/NIMHD NIH HHS/United States
    U54CA155496/CA/NCI NIH HHS/United States
    T32 HL067702/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/United States
    U54 CA155496/CA/NCI NIH HHS/United States
  • Document Type:
  • Description:
    Introduction

    We examined racial/ethnic heterogeneity in self-reported diabetes prevalence over 15 years.

    Methods

    We used National Health Interview Survey data for 1997 through 2012 on 452,845 adults aged 18 years or older. Annual self-reported diabetes prevalence was estimated by race/ethnicity and education. We tested for trends over time by education and race/ethnicity. We also analyzed racial/ethnic and education trends in average annual prevalence.

    Results

    During the 15 years studied, diabetes prevalence differed significantly by race/ethnicity (P < .001) and by Hispanic subgroup (P < .001). Among participants with less than a high school education, the 5-year trend in diabetes prevalence was highest among Cubans and Cuban Americans (β5YR = 4.8, P = .002), Puerto Ricans (β5YR = 2.2, P = .06), non-Hispanic blacks (β5YR = 2.2, P < .001), and non-Hispanic whites (β5YR = 2.1, P < .001). Among participants with more than a high school education, non-Hispanic blacks had the highest average annual prevalence (5.5%) and Puerto Ricans had the highest 5-year trend in annual diabetes prevalence (β5YR = 2.6, P = .001).

    Conclusions

    In this representative sample of US adults, results show ethnic variations in diabetes prevalence. The prevalence of diabetes is higher among Hispanics than among non-Hispanic whites, unevenly distributed across Hispanic subgroups, and more pronounced over time and by education. Findings support disaggregation of data for racial/ethnic populations in the United States to monitor trends in diabetes disparities and the use of targeted, culturally appropriate interventions to prevent diabetes.