National and state prevalence of smoke-free rules in homes with and without children and smokers: Two decades of progress☆
Advanced Search
Select up to three search categories and corresponding keywords using the fields to the right. Refer to the Help section for more detailed instructions.

Search our Collections & Repository

All these words:

For very narrow results

This exact word or phrase:

When looking for a specific result

Any of these words:

Best used for discovery & interchangable words

None of these words:

Recommended to be used in conjunction with other fields

Language:

Dates

Publication Date Range:

to

Document Data

Title:

Document Type:

Library

Collection:

Series:

People

Author:

Help
Clear All

Query Builder

Query box

Help
Clear All

For additional assistance using the Custom Query please check out our Help Page

i

National and state prevalence of smoke-free rules in homes with and without children and smokers: Two decades of progress☆

Filetype[PDF-849.07 KB]


  • English

  • Details:

    • Alternative Title:
      Prev Med
    • Description:
      Objective

      The home is the primary source of secondhand smoke (SHS) exposure for children. We assessed national and state progress in smoke-free home (SFH) rule adoption in homes with and without children and adult smokers.

      Methods

      Data came from the 1992–1993 and 2010–2011 Tobacco Use Supplements to the Current Population Survey, a U.S. national probability household survey. Households were defined as having a SFH rule if all household respondents aged ≥ 18 indicated no one was allowed to smoke inside the home at any time. Households with children were those with occupants aged <18. Smokers were those who smoked ≥ 100 lifetime cigarettes and now smoked “everyday” or “some days”.

      Results

      From 1992–1993 to 2010–2011, SFH rule prevalence increased from 43.0% to 83.0% (p < .05). Among households with children, SFH rules increased overall (44.9% to 88.6%), in households without smokers (59.7% to 95.0%), and households with ≥ 1 smokers (9.7% to 61.0%) (p < .05). Among households without children, SFH rules increased overall (40.8% to 81.1%), in households without smokers (53.4% to 90.1%), and households with ≥ 1 smokers (6.3% to 40.9%) (p < .05). Prevalence increased in all states, irrespective of smoker or child occupancy (p < .05). In 2010–2011, among homes with smokers and children, SFH rule prevalence ranged from 36.5% (West Virginia) to 86.8% (California).

      Conclusions

      Considerable progress has been made adopting SFH rules, but many U.S. children continue to be exposed to SHS because their homes are not smoke-free. Further efforts to promote adoption of SFH rules are essential to protect all children from this health risk.

    • Pubmed ID:
      26601642
    • Pubmed Central ID:
      PMC4766981
    • Document Type:
    • Place as Subject:
    • Collection(s):
    • Main Document Checksum:
    • File Type:

    Supporting Files

    More +

    You May Also Like

    Checkout today's featured content at stacks.cdc.gov