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Chronic fatigue syndrome : advancing research and clinical education
  • Published Date:
    February 16, 2016
  • Language:
    English
Filetype[PDF-7.97 MB]


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Chronic fatigue syndrome : advancing research and clinical education
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  • Description:
    Clinical Presentation of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome [PDF version of the PowerPoint presentation by Charles W. Lapp, p. 2-15] -- Public Health Approach to CFS [PDF version of the PowerPoint presentation by Elizabeth R. Unger, p. 16-31]-- Lessons from the Institute of Medicine and NIH Pathways to Prevention Reports [PDF version of the PowerPoint presentation by Anthony L. Komaroff, p. 32-544 ] -- Post-Infectious Chronic Fatigue Syndrome: Intramural Research at the National Institutes of Health [PDF version of the PowerPoint presentation by Avindra Nath,, p. 45-54].

    We may know chronic fatigue syndrome by several other names, myalgic encephalomyelitis and systemic exertion intolerance disease among them. Doctors and scientists have not yet found what causes chronic fatigue syndrome. Infections and other medical and biological events are among the many possible triggers, but with no certain cause this disease is difficult to diagnose. A systematic approach to evaluating people with persistent symptoms combined with new diagnostic criteria offers hope for more accurate and faster diagnosis.

    Chronic fatigue syndrome is a devastating disorder. There is a lot about this disease that we don't know, but what we know for sure is that patients with chronic fatigue syndrome are suffering. Patients experience not only extreme fatigue, but often many other symptoms such as impaired thinking and insomnia. This condition can persist for years, and those with chronic fatigue syndrome are often unable to work, participate in daily activities, or attend school. Over the past several years, research has shined new light on this complex condition. The Institute of Medicine is encouraging healthcare providers to look at chronic fatigue syndrome in new ways.

    In this session of Public Health Grand Rounds, our expert panel of clinicians, epidemiologists, and researchers will discuss how they approach diagnosis and treatment in their own practices, how the diagnostic criteria for chronic fatigue syndrome have changed over the years, and how the public health community can continue to improve knowledge and understanding of this complex disorder.

    Tuesday, February 16, 2016 at 1 pm ET

    Presented by: Charles W. Lapp, MD, Medical Director, Hunter-Hopkins Center, P.A. ["Clinical Presentation of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome"]; Elizabeth R. Unger, PhD, MD, Chief, Chronic Viral Diseases Branch, Division of High-Consequence Pathogens and Pathology, National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases, CDC ["Public Health Approach to Chronic Fatigue Syndrome"]; Anthony L. Komaroff, MD, Simcox-Clifford-Higby Professor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Senior Physician, Brigham and Women's Hospital ["Lessons from the Institute of Medicine and NIH Pathways to Prevention Reports"]; Avindra Nath, MD, Chief, Section of Infections of the Nervous System, National Institute of Neurological Diseases and Stroke ["Post-Infectious Chronic Fatigue Syndrome: Intramural Research at the National Institutes of Health"].

    Facilitated by: John Iskander, MD, MPH, Scientific Director, Public Health Grand Rounds; Phoebe Thorpe, MD, MPH, Deputy Scientific Director, Public Health Grand Rounds; Susan Laird, MSN, RN, Communications Director, Public Health Grand Rounds.

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