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Supervisor Support Buffers Daily Psychological and Physiological Reactivity to Work-to-Family Conflict
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Details:
  • Pubmed ID:
    26778857
  • Pubmed Central ID:
    PMC4712734
  • Funding:
    U01 HD051217/HD/NICHD NIH HHS/United States
    U01 HD051256/HD/NICHD NIH HHS/United States
    UL1 TR001425/TR/NCATS NIH HHS/United States
    U01 OH008788/OH/NIOSH CDC HHS/United States
    U01 AG027669/AG/NIA NIH HHS/United States
    R01 HL107240/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/United States
    U01 HD059773/HD/NICHD NIH HHS/United States
    U01 HD051276/HD/NICHD NIH HHS/United States
    U01 HD051218/HD/NICHD NIH HHS/United States
  • Document Type:
  • Collection(s):
  • Description:
    Using a daily diary design, the current study assessed within-person associations of work-to-family conflict with negative affect and salivary cortisol. Furthermore, we investigated whether supervisor support moderated these associations. Over eight consecutive days, 131 working parents employed by an information technology company answered telephone interviews about stressors and mood that occurred in the previous 24 hours. On Days 2-4 of the study protocol, they also provided five saliva samples throughout the day that were assayed for cortisol. Results indicated a high degree of day-to-day fluctuation in work-to-family conflict, with employed parents having greater negative affect and poorer cortisol regulation on days with higher work-to-family conflict compared to days when they experience lower work-to-family conflict. These associations were buffered, however, when individuals had supervisors who offered support. Discussion centers on the use of dynamic assessments of work-to-family conflict and employee well-being.