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Common elements in guidelines for prescribing opioids for chronic pain
  • Published Date:
    6/12/14
  • Language:
    English
Filetype[PDF - 122.55 KB]


Details:
  • Corporate Authors:
    National Center for Injury Prevention and Control (U.S.). Division of Unintentional Injury Prevention.
  • Description:
    The use of opioids for treating chronic pain has been increasing. In 2010, an estimated 20% of patients presenting to physician offices in the United States with pain symptoms or diagnoses were prescribed opioids. Improving the way opioids are prescribed through clinical practice guidelines can ensure patients have access to safe, effective treatment while reducing the number of people who misuse, abuse or overdose from these powerful drugs.

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, along with the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), and the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology (ONC), reviewed eight guidelines to identify common recommendations (see accompanying Table). Guidelines on chronic pain that had been issued on or before January 2013 and developed by professional societies, states, or Federal agencies for general practitioners were considered. Guidelines for specific conditions or subpopulations were excluded, as were those specific to pain specialists.

    Guidelines varied by development methodology (systematic review, expert opinion) and conflict of interest management (disclosure, voting recusal) (see Table). According to the Institute of Medicine, trustworthy clinical practice guidelines appropriately manage conflict of interest, use systematic reviews of the evidence to inform recommendations, and rate the strength of the evidence and recommendations.

    Publication date from document properties.

    common_elements_in_guidelines_for_prescribing_opioids-a.pdf

  • Supporting Files:
    No Additional Files