Welcome to CDC Stacks | Experimental flammability limits and associated theoretical flame temperatures as a tool for predicting the temperature dependence of these limits - 37084 | CDC Public Access
Stacks Logo
Advanced Search
Select up to three search categories and corresponding keywords using the fields to the right. Refer to the Help section for more detailed instructions.
 
 
Help
Clear All Simple Search
Advanced Search
Experimental flammability limits and associated theoretical flame temperatures as a tool for predicting the temperature dependence of these limits
  • Published Date:
    May 2012
  • Source:
    J Loss Prev Process Ind. 25(3):555-560.
Filetype[PDF - 5.90 MB]


This document cannot be previewed automatically as it exceeds 5 MB
Please click the thumbnail image to view the document.
Experimental flammability limits and associated theoretical flame temperatures as a tool for predicting the temperature dependence of these limits
Details:
  • Personal Authors:
  • Pubmed ID:
    26692639
  • Pubmed Central ID:
    PMC4676578
  • Funding:
    CC999999/Intramural CDC HHS/United States
  • Document Type:
  • Collection(s):
  • Description:
    The utility and limitations of adiabatic flame temperature calculations and minimum mixture energies in predicting the temperature dependence of flammability limits are explored. The limiting flame temperatures at constant pressure (1 bar) are calculated using a standard widely-used thermodynamic computer program. The computation is based on the calculated limiting flame temperature value at the reference initial temperature and the experimental limit concentration. The values recently determined in large chambers for the lower and upper flammability limits of a variety of simple organic and inorganic gases (methane, ethylene, dimethylether, and carbon monoxide) are used as the basis for the predictions of the limiting flame temperature concept. Such thermodynamic calculations are compared with more traditional ones based on a limiting mixture energy and a constant average heat capacity of the reactant mixture. The advantages and limitations of the methods are discussed in this paper.