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Manual for the surveillance of vaccine-preventable diseases. Chapter 14: Rubella
  • Published Date:
    Sept 2014
  • Language:
    English
Filetype[PDF - 537.08 KB]


Details:
  • Corporate Authors:
    National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (U.S.)
  • Series:
    Manual for the surveillance of vaccine-preventable diseases ; chapter 14
  • Document Type:
  • Description:
    Chapter 14 of: Manual for the surveillance of vaccine-preventable diseases. 5th edition, 2012.

    Rubella is a viral illness caused by a togavirus of the genus Rubivirus and is characterized by a mild, maculopapular rash. The rubella rash occurs in 50%–80% of rubella-infected persons and is sometimes misdiagnosed as measles or scarlet fever. Children usually develop few or no constitutional symptoms, but adults may experience a 1–5-day prodrome of low-grade fever, headache, malaise, mild coryza, and conjunctivitis. Postauricular, occipital and posterior cervical lymphadenopathy is characteristic and precedes the rash by 5–10 days. Arthralgia or arthritis may occur in up to 70% of adult women with rubella. Rare complications include thrombocytopenic purpura and encephalitis.1–3 Rubella is transmitted through direct or droplet contact from nasopharyngeal secretions and has an average incubation period of 17 days (range: 12–23 days). Persons with rubella are most infectious when rash is erupting, but they can shed virus from 7 days before to 7 days after rash onset.

    chpt14-rubella.pdf

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