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Intention to Receive Influenza Vaccine After an Acute Respiratory Illness
Filetype[PDF - 389.83 KB]


Details:
  • Pubmed ID:
    26018106
  • Pubmed Central ID:
    PMC4673886
  • Funding:
    U01 IP000467/IP/NCIRD CDC HHS/United States
    UL-1TR000005/TR/NCATS NIH HHS/United States
    UL1 RR024153/RR/NCRR NIH HHS/United States
    UL1 RR024153/RR/NCRR NIH HHS/United States
    UL1 TR000005/TR/NCATS NIH HHS/United States
  • Document Type:
  • Collection(s):
  • Description:
    Objective

    To determine the effects of symptoms and presence of confirmed influenza on intention to receive an influenza vaccine, specifically in patients recovering from a medically-attended acute (≤ 7 days’ duration) respiratory illness (ARI).

    Methods

    During the 2013–2014 influenza season, individuals seeking outpatient care for an ARI that included cough were tested for influenza using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction assays (PCR) and completed surveys. Children (6 months–18 years) and adults (≥ 18 years) were grouped by their combined current season’s influenza vaccination status (vaccinated/not vaccinated) and their vaccination intentions for next season (intend/do not intend).

    Results

    Forty-one percent (323/786) were unvaccinated at enrollment, of whom nearly half (151/323) intended to be vaccinated next season. When adjusting for demographic, health and other factors, unvaccinated individuals who intended to be vaccinated next season were approximately 1.5 times more likely to have PCR-confirmed influenza compared with vaccinated individuals who intended to be vaccinated next season.

    Conclusion

    The combined experience of not being vaccinated against influenza and seeking medical attention for an ARI seemed to influence approximately one-half of unvaccinated participants to consider influenza vaccination for next season.