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Adverse Childhood Events Are Related to the Prevalence of Asthma and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disorder Among Adult Women In Hawaii
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Details:
  • Pubmed ID:
    26267594
  • Pubmed Central ID:
    PMC4654662
  • Description:
    PURPOSE

    In the US, women surpass men in the prevalence of lung diseases. Limited studies exist on the association of adverse childhood events (ACEs) to asthma and COPD particularly among women and cohorts of understudied populations (e.g. Pacific Islanders). This study evaluated the ACEs-asthma and ACEs-COPD relationships among women in Hawaii and the contribution of poor health factors (smoking, binge drinking and obesity) in these associations.

    METHODS

    Using data from 3,363 women in the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System-Hawaii, we assessed how self-reported ACEs (count and type [household dysfunction, and physical, verbal and sexual abuse]) relate to asthma and COPD. Multivariable log-binomial regression, accounting for the sampling design, and model adjustments for socio-demographics, healthcare access, emotional support, current smoking, binge drinking and BMI status were used to generate prevalence ratios.

    RESULTS

    For every increase in ACE count, the likelihood for asthma increased by 7% (CI=1.02–1.13), and for COPD, by 21% (CI=1.12–1.31) accounting for socio-demographics, healthcare access and emotional support. Verbal abuse was also associated with greater likelihood for asthma independent of these covariates (PR=1.43, CI=1.14–1.79). Household dysfunction (PR=1.82, CI=1.15–2.82) and physical (PR=2.01, CI=1.20–3.37), verbal (PR=2.24, CI=1.38–3.65) and sexual (PR=1.81, CI=1.10–2.97) abuse were all associated with COPD using similar adjustments. Additional adjustment for smoking, binge drinking and BMI status did not impact the ACE-asthma associations and only modestly attenuated the ACE-COPD relationships.

    CONCLUSIONS

    Primary and secondary prevention of ACEs may optimize the health of young girls in Hawaii, and reduce the burden of asthma and COPD among women in the state.

  • Document Type:
  • Collection(s):
  • Funding:
    T32 HL079891/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/United States
    U58 DP001962/DP/NCCDPHP CDC HHS/United States
    1U58/DP001962-01W1/DP/NCCDPHP CDC HHS/United States
    T32 DK062707/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/United States
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