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Evaluating the Effects of Coping Style on Allostatic Load, by Sex: The Jackson Heart Study, 2000–2004
Filetype[PDF - 211.55 KB]


Details:
  • Pubmed ID:
    26425869
  • Pubmed Central ID:
    PMC4591617
  • Funding:
    . HHSN268201300049C/PHS HHS/United States
    5F31MH104000-01/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/United States
    HHSN268201300046C/PHS HHS/United States
    HHSN268201300047C/PHS HHS/United States
    HHSN268201300048C/PHS HHS/United States
    HHSN268201300050C/PHS HHS/United States
    P60MD002249/MD/NIMHD NIH HHS/United States
    R25GM083270/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/United States
  • Document Type:
  • Description:
    The objective of this study was to examine the cross-sectional association between coping styles and allostatic load among African American adults in the Jackson Heart Study (2000-2004). Coping styles were assessed using the Coping Strategies Inventory-Short Form; allostatic load was measured by using 9 biomarkers standardized into z-scores. Sex-stratified multivariable linear regressions indicated that females who used disengagement coping styles had significantly higher allostatic load scores (β = 0.016; 95% CI, 0.001-0.032); no such associations were found in males. Future longitudinal investigations should examine why disengagement coping style is linked to increased allostatic load to better inform effective interventions and reduce health disparities among African American women.