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Associations between concentrations of uric acid with concentrations of vitamin A and beta-carotene among adults in the United States☆
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Details:
  • Pubmed ID:
    24267038
  • Pubmed Central ID:
    PMC4589134
  • Description:
    Our objective was to examine the cross-sectional associations between concentrations of vitamin A and beta-carotene, a major source of vitamin A, with concentrations of uric acid in a nationally representative sample of adults from the United States. We conducted a cross-sectional study using data from up to 10893 participants aged ≥ 20 years of National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey from 2001 to 2006. Concentrations of uric acid adjusted for numerous covariates increased from 305.8 μmol/L in the lowest quintile of vitamin A to 335.3 μmol/L in the highest quintile (p for linear trend <0.001). The prevalence ratio for hyperuricemia also increased progressively across quintiles of serum vitamin A reaching 1.82 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.52, 2.16; p for linear trend <0.001) in the top quintile in the maximally adjusted model. Adjusted mean concentrations of uric acid decreased progressively from quintile 1 (333.8 μmol/L) through quintile 4 of concentrations of beta-carotene and were similar for quintiles 4 (313.5 μmol/L) and 5 (313.8 μmol/L). Concentrations of beta-carotene were inversely associated with hyperuricemia (adjusted prevalence ratio comparing highest with lowest quintile = 0.61; 95% CI: 0.52, 0.72; p for linear trend <0.001). Concentrations of uric acid were significantly and positively associated with concentrations of vitamin A and inversely with concentrations of beta-carotene. These cross-sectional findings require confirmation with experimental studies of vitamin A and beta-carotene supplementation.

  • Document Type:
  • Collection(s):
  • Funding:
    CC999999/Intramural CDC HHS/United States
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