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Births in the United States, 2014
  • Published Date:
    September 2015
  • Language:
    English
Filetype[PDF - 491.10 KB]


Details:
  • Corporate Authors:
    National Center for Health Statistics (U.S.)
  • Series:
    NCHS data brief ; no. 218
    DHHS publication ; no. (PHS) 2015–1209
  • Document Type:
  • Description:
    This report presents several key demographic and maternal and infant health indicators by race and Hispanic origin, using 2014 final birth data. Trends in general fertility rates (GFRs), teen birth rates, and cesarean delivery and preterm birth rates are explored by race and Hispanic origin group (non- Hispanic white, non-Hispanic black, Hispanic, American Indian or Alaska Native [AIAN], and Asian or Pacific Islander [API]), with special focus on the most current period, 2013–2014. An earlier report presented 2014 preliminary data on selected topics (1). Data are from the annual national natality files, representing 100% of births to U.S. residents.

    Key findings:

    • The number of births per 1,000 women aged 15–44 (the general fertility rate) in the United States increased slightly in 2014, to 62.9—the first increase since 2007. Rates rose for non-Hispanic white and Asian or Pacific Islander women, but historic lows were observed for Hispanic women and American Indian or Alaska Native women.

    • Teen childbearing in the United States in 2014 fell to another historic low of 24.2 per 1,000 females. Record lows were seen for each race and Hispanic origin group.

    • The cesarean delivery rate declined to 32.2% of births in 2014, down 2% from the 2009 peak of 32.9%. Declines in rates were seen for most race and Hispanic origin groups for 2013–2014.

    • The preterm birth rate fell slightly in 2014 to 9.57% of births, down 8% from the 2007 high. Preterm rates declined among most race and Hispanic origin groups during 2007–2014.

    Suggested citation: Martin JA, Hamilton BE, Osterman MJK. Births in the United States, 2014. NCHS data brief, no 216. Hyattsville, MD: National Center for Health Statistics. 2015.

    CS259336

  • Supporting Files:
    No Additional Files