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Validation of an HPLC-MS/MS and Wipe Procedure for Mitomycin C Contamination
  • Published Date:
    Aug 16 2014
  • Source:
    J Chromatogr Sci. 53(4):619-624.
Filetype[PDF - 324.55 KB]


Details:
  • Pubmed ID:
    25129062
  • Pubmed Central ID:
    PMC4556226
  • Funding:
    CC999999/Intramural CDC HHS/United States
  • Document Type:
  • Collection(s):
  • Description:
    A high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometric (HPLC-MS/MS) method was developed for the determination of mitomycin C, an anticancer drug, from contamination on various surfaces. Mitomycin C is often used in various forms of intraperitoneal chemotherapy, and operating room healthcare worker exposure to this drug is possible. The surface testing method consisted of a wiping procedure utilizing a solution of 20/45/35 (v/v/v) of acetonitrile-isopropanol-water made 0.01 M in ammonium citrate (apparent pH 7.0). The wipe solutions were analyzed by means of HPLC-MS/MS using a reversed-phase gradient system and electrospray ionization in positive ion mode with a triple-quadrupole MS detector. Accuracy and precision of this method were demonstrated by a series of recovery studies of both spiked solutions and extracted wipes from various surfaces (stainless steel, vinyl and Formica(®)) spiked with known levels of mitomycin C. Recoveries of spiked solutions containing the analyte demonstrate mean recoveries (accuracy) ranged from 93 to 105%. Precision as measured by the relative standard deviation (% RSD) of multiple samples (n= 10) at each concentration level demonstrated values of 7.5% or less. The recoveries from spiked surfaces varied from 30 to 99%. The limit of detection for this methodology is ∼2 ng/100 cm(2) equivalent surface area, and the limit of quantitation is ∼6 ng/100 cm(2).