Use of calorie information at fast-food and chain restaurants among US Adults, 2009
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Use of calorie information at fast-food and chain restaurants among US Adults, 2009

Filetype[PDF-210.47 KB]


  • English

  • Details:

    • Alternative Title:
      J Public Health (Oxf)
    • Description:
      Background

      The aim of this study was to examine reading and use of calorie information at fast-food/chain restaurants.

      Methods

      A cross-sectional analysis was conducted on a sample of 4363 US adults using the 2009 HealthStyles survey. The outcome variable was reading calorie information when available while ordering at fast-food/chain restaurants. Among those who go to fast-food/chain restaurants, we conducted multivariable logistic regression to examine associations between sociodemographic variables and reading calorie information when available. Among those who report reading calorie information when available, we assessed the proportion using calorie information.

      Results

      Among those who reported eating at fast-food/chain restaurants, 36.4% reported reading calorie information when available. Reading calorie information was not related to race/ethnicity, income or education. Compared with men, women had higher odds [adjusted odds ratio (OR) =1.8; 95% confidence interval (CI) =1.5–2.1] of reading calorie information when available while those who frequented fast-food/chain restaurants ≥3 times/week (aOR =0.6; 95% CI =0.4–0.8) had lower odds compared with those going <4 times/month. Of those who reported reading calorie information when available, 95.4% reported using calorie information at least sometimes.

      Conclusions

      Almost all who read calorie information when available use the information at least sometimes. Research is needed on how calorie information is being used.

    • Pubmed ID:
      24263224
    • Pubmed Central ID:
      PMC4554521
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