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Study of nebulization delivery of aerosolized fluorescent microspheres to the avian respiratory tract
  • Published Date:
    Jun 2012
  • Source:
    Avian Dis. 56(2):381-386.
Filetype[PDF-313.24 KB]


Details:
  • Pubmed ID:
    22856198
  • Pubmed Central ID:
    PMC4451201
  • Description:
    This study investigated the delivery of an aerosol of monodisperse microspheres to the respiratory tract of birds following aerosol exposure. Adult domestic pigeons (Columbia livia domestica, n = 5 birds per timed treatment) were exposed to an aerosol of fluorescent 1.0 microm diameter carboxylate microspheres for 0.5, 1, 2, or 4 hr. During the aerosolization period, the birds were free-standing in a plexiglass treatment chamber and the aerosol was delivered using a commercial nebulizer. Immediately following aerosol exposure, the birds were euthanatized and the carcasses were intravenously infused with a modified paraformaldehyde/gluteraldehyde fixative. Evaluation of microsphere distribution was performed using a stereoscopic microscope with an epifluorescent module. The results from this study revealed that the amount of aerosolized particles delivered using a commercial nebulizer was proportional to exposure periods. Aerosol exposure periods of 0.5 hr or 1 hr did not result in a readily observable distribution of 1.0 microm fluorescent microspheres to the cranial thoracic, caudal thoracic, or abdominal air sac membranes. This was partly attributed to the relatively low concentration of the individual monodisperse microspheres in the aerosolized suspension. The 2- and 4-hr exposure periods resulted in readily observable deposition of the 1.0 mirom fluorescent microspheres in the cranial thoracic, caudal thoracic, or abdominal air sac membranes, with the 4-hr exposure period resulting in the greatest number of particles on the membrane surfaces. For each of the exposure periods, there was individual animal variation regarding the distribution and relative number of spheres deposited. This study demonstrates the widespread deposition of particles that had an aerodynamic equivalent diameter of approximately 1 microm and provides a better understanding of particle deposition efficiency within the respiratory system following aerosol exposure in birds.

  • Document Type:
  • Collection(s):
  • Funding:
    U01 ES020127/ES/NIEHS NIH HHS/United States
    1U01 ES020127/ES/NIEHS NIH HHS/United States
    U07/CCU906162/CC/ODCDC CDC HHS/United States
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