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Why more male pedestrians die in vehicle-pedestrian collisions than females: a decompositional analysis
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Details:
  • Pubmed ID:
    23197672
  • Pubmed Central ID:
    PMC3715558
  • Description:
    Objective

    Pedestrians account for a third of the 1.2 million traffic fatalities annually worldwide, and males are overrepresented. We examined the factors that contribute to this male-female discrepancy: walking exposure (kilometers walked per person-year), vehicle-pedestrian collision risk (number of collisions per kilometers walked), and vehicle-pedestrian collision case fatality rate (number of deaths per collision).

    Design

    The decomposition method quantifies the relative contributions of individual factors to death rate ratios among groups. The male-female ratio of pedestrian death rates can be expressed as the product of three component ratios: walking exposure, collision risk, and case fatality rate. Data sources included the 2008–2009 U.S. Fatality Analysis Reporting System, General Estimates System, National Household Travel Survey, and population estimates.

    Setting

    U.S.

    Participants

    Pedestrians age 5 and older.

    Main outcome measures

    death rate per person-year, kilometers walked per person-year, collisions per kilometers walked, and deaths per collision by sex.

    Results

    The pedestrian death rate per person-year for males was 2.3 times that for females. This ratio of male to female rates can be expressed as the product of three component ratios: 0.995 for walking exposure, 1.191 for collision risk, and 1.976 for case fatality rate. The relative contributions of these components were 1%, 20% and 79%, respectively.

    Conclusions

    The majority of the male-female discrepancy in 2008–2009 pedestrian deaths in the U.S. is attributed to a higher fatality per collision rate among male pedestrians.

  • Document Type:
  • Collection(s):
  • Funding:
    R01 AA018313/AA/NIAAA NIH HHS/United States
    R01 HD074594/HD/NICHD NIH HHS/United States
    R01AA18313/AA/NIAAA NIH HHS/United States
    R21CE001820/CE/NCIPC CDC HHS/United States
    R49CE001170/CE/NCIPC CDC HHS/United States
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