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Association of physical violence by an intimate partner around the time of pregnancy with inadequate gestational weight gain in Oklahoma
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Details:
  • Pubmed ID:
    21324411
  • Pubmed Central ID:
    PMC3443557
  • Funding:
    5UR6DP000483/DP/NCCDPHP CDC HHS/United States
    Z01 AG000194-01/Intramural NIH HHS/United States
  • Document Type:
  • Collection(s):
  • Description:
    Intimate partner violence has been previously examined in relation to a variety of pregnancy, labor and delivery outcomes. We evaluated whether women who experienced physical violence by their intimate partners around the time of pregnancy were less likely to achieve weight gain according to the US Institute of Medicine (IOM) guidelines. A cross-sectional study was conducted using the 2000-2006 Oklahoma Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring Survey (PRAMS) data for post-partum women, 20 years and older. Physical violence perpetrated by an intimate partner before and/or during pregnancy was prevalent in nearly 6.5% of women. Weight gain was adequate in 38.8%, deficient in 28.4% and excessive in 32.8% of these women, respectively. After adjusting for maternal age, marital status, education, pregnancy intention, stressful life events, third-trimester use of tobacco and alcohol and gestational age at delivery, physical violence by an intimate partner around the time of pregnancy was positively but non-significantly associated with excessive (but not deficient) gestational weight gain. After stratifying by age group, positive and significant associations between physical violence by an intimate partner around the time of pregnancy and inadequate gestational weight gain were observed only among women 35 years and older. With the exception of mothers ≥ 35 years of age, deficient and excessive gestational weight gains were not significantly related to experiences with physical violence by an intimate partner prior to delivery. Prospective cohort studies are needed to establish whether other forms of violence, including emotional and sexual abuse, can affect gestational weight gain and whether gestational weight gain can mediate the effect of physical, sexual and emotional abuse on pregnancy, labor and delivery outcomes.