Welcome to CDC Stacks | Differences in the Social Networks of African American Men Who Have Sex With Men Only and Those Who Have Sex With Men and Women - 33273 | CDC Public Access
Stacks Logo
Advanced Search
Select up to three search categories and corresponding keywords using the fields to the right. Refer to the Help section for more detailed instructions.
 
 
Help
Clear All Simple Search
Advanced Search
Differences in the Social Networks of African American Men Who Have Sex With Men Only and Those Who Have Sex With Men and Women
Filetype[PDF - 55.44 KB]


Details:
  • Pubmed ID:
    21852650
  • Pubmed Central ID:
    PMC3222365
  • Funding:
    1 UR6 PS000355-01/PS/NCHHSTP CDC HHS/United States
    K01 HD061269/HD/NICHD NIH HHS/United States
    K01 HD061269-04/HD/NICHD NIH HHS/United States
    R01 DA022961/DA/NIDA NIH HHS/United States
    R01 DA031030/DA/NIDA NIH HHS/United States
  • Document Type:
  • Collection(s):
  • Description:
    Objectives

    We compared social network characteristics of African American men who have sex with men only (MSMO) with social network characteristics of African American men who have sex with men and women (MSMW).

    Methods

    Study participants were 234 African American men who have sex with men who completed a baseline social network assessment for a pilot behavioral HIV prevention intervention in Baltimore, Maryland, from 2006 through 2009. We surveyed the men to elicit the characteristics of their social networks, and we used logistic regression models to assess differences in network characteristics.

    Results

    MSMO were significantly more likely than were MSMW to be HIV-positive (52% vs 31%). We found no differences between MSMO and MSMW in the size of kin networks or emotional and material support networks. MSMW had denser sexual networks, reported more concurrent and exchange partners, used condoms with more sexual partners, and reported interaction with a larger number of sexual partners at least once a week.

    Conclusions

    Although there were many similarities in the social and sexual network characteristics of MSMO and MSMW, differences did exist. HIV prevention interventions should address the unique needs of African American MSMW.