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Impact of Communication on Preventive Services Among Deaf American Sign Language Users
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Details:
  • Pubmed ID:
    21665066
  • Pubmed Central ID:
    PMC3117257
  • Description:
    Background

    Deaf American Sign Language (ASL) users face communication and language barriers that limit healthcare communication with their providers. Prior research has not examined preventive services with ASL-skilled clinicians.

    Purpose

    The goal of this study was to determine whether provider language concordance is associated with improved receipt of preventive services among deaf respondents.

    Methods

    This cross-sectional study included 89 deaf respondents aged 50–75 years from the Deaf Health Survey (2008), a BRFSS survey adapted for use with deaf ASL users. Association between the respondent's communication method with the provider (i.e., categorized as either concordant–doctor signs or discordant–other) and preventive services use was assessed using logistic regression adjusting for race, gender, income, health status, health insurance, and education. Analyses were conducted in 2010.

    Results

    Deaf respondents who reported having a concordant provider were more likely to report a greater number of preventive services (OR 3.42; 95% CI:1.31, 8.93; p=0.0122) when compared to deaf respondents who reported having a discordant provider even after adjusting for race, gender, income, health status, health insurance, and education. In unadjusted analyses, deaf respondents who reported having a concordant provider were more likely to receive an influenza vaccination in the past year (OR 4.55; p=0.016) when compared to respondents who had a discordant provider.

    Conclusions

    Language-concordant patient–provider communication is associated with higher appropriate use of preventive services by deaf ASL users.

  • Document Type:
  • Collection(s):
  • Funding:
    K01 HL103140/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/United States
    K01 HL103140-01/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/United States
    K01 HL103140-01/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/United States
    K08 HS015700/HS/AHRQ HHS/United States
    K08 HS15700/HS/AHRQ HHS/United States
    KL2 RR 024136/RR/NCRR NIH HHS/United States
    KL2 RR024136/RR/NCRR NIH HHS/United States
    T32 HL007937/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/United States
    T32 HL007937/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/United States
    T32 HL007937-10/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/United States
    U48 DP000031/DP/NCCDPHP CDC HHS/United States
    U48 DP000031/DP/NCCDPHP CDC HHS/United States
    U48 DP001910/DP/NCCDPHP CDC HHS/United States
    U48 DP001910/DP/NCCDPHP CDC HHS/United States
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