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Utilization of CDC recommendations for good laboratory practices in biochemical genetic testing and newborn screening for inherited metabolic diseases : current status, lessons learned and next steps to advance and evaluate impact
  • Published Date:
    October 2014
  • Language:
    English
Filetype[PDF - 1.79 MB]


Details:
  • Corporate Authors:
    Association of Public Health Laboratories (U.S.) ; National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (U.S.) ; Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U.S.). Office of Surveillance, Epidemiology and Laboratory Services. ; ... More ▼
  • Funding:
    U60HM000803
  • Document Type:
  • Description:
    In April 2012, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) published “Good Laboratory Practice Recommendations for Biochemical Genetic Testing and Newborn Screening for Inherited Metabolic Disorders” as a Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR) Recommendations and Reports publication (1). To assess awareness and use of the recommendations in the MMWR document by the key intended audience — laboratory professionals in biochemical genetic testing (BGT) and public health newborn screening (NBS) laboratories — two facilitated discussion groups were held: one with NBS laboratory professionals and one with BGT laboratory professionals. The groups were held in Atlanta, Georgia, on December 4, 2013, with five and eight participants, respectively. The results presented in this report reflect the feedback from these two discussion groups, summarized into the eight topic areas listed below with clarifying information from the Association of Public Health Laboratories and CDC project team members noted where appropriate.

    This project was 100% funded with federal funds from a federal program of $250,000. This report was supported by Cooperative Agreement # U60HM000803 funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Its contents are solely the responsibility of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official views of CDC or the Department of Health and Human Services.

  • Supporting Files:
    No Additional Files