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Depressed Affect and Dietary Restraint in Adolescent Boys’ and Girls’ Eating in the Absence of Hunger
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Details:
  • Pubmed ID:
    25936291
  • Pubmed Central ID:
    PMC4459929
  • Funding:
    1ZIAHD000641/PHS HHS/United States
    F32 HD056762/HD/NICHD NIH HHS/United States
    F32HD056762/HD/NICHD NIH HHS/United States
    K99 HD069516/HD/NICHD NIH HHS/United States
    K99HD069516/HD/NICHD NIH HHS/United States
    R00 HD069516/HD/NICHD NIH HHS/United States
    R00HD069516/HD/NICHD NIH HHS/United States
    Y1CH8385858/CH/OID CDC HHS/United States
    Z01 HD000641-12/Intramural NIH HHS/United States
    Z01 HD000641-13/Intramural NIH HHS/United States
    Z99 HD999999/Intramural NIH HHS/United States
    ZIA HD000641-14/Intramural NIH HHS/United States
    ZIA HD000641-19/Intramural NIH HHS/United States
  • Document Type:
  • Collection(s):
  • Description:
    Data suggest that depressed affect and dietary restraint are related to disinhibited eating patterns in children and adults. Yet, experimental research has not determined to what extent depressed affect acutely affects eating in the absence of physiological hunger (EAH) in adolescents. In the current between-subjects experimental study, we measured EAH in 182 adolescent (13-17 y) girls (65%) and boys as ad libitum palatable snack food intake after youth ate to satiety from a buffet meal. Just prior to EAH, participants were randomly assigned to view either a sad or neutral film clip. Dietary restraint was measured with the Eating Disorder Examination. Adolescents who viewed the sad film clip reported small but significant increases in state depressed affect relative to adolescents who viewed the neutral film clip (p < .001). Yet, there was no main effect of film condition on EAH (p = .26). Instead, dietary restraint predicted greater EAH among girls, but not boys (p < .001). These findings provide evidence that adolescent girls' propensity to report restrained eating is associated with their greater disinhibited eating in the laboratory. Additional experimental research, perhaps utilizing a more potent laboratory stressor and manipulating both affective state and dietary restraint, is required to elucidate how state affect may interact with dietary restraint to influence EAH during adolescence.